China Daily

In the wee-hours of this morning (for U.S. readers), Chinese-American designer Derek Lam hosted a party in Shanghai at Unico at 3 on the Bund with Shopbop.com to fete his 10 Crosby resort collection. Shopbop, which launched a fully-translated Mandarin site last year, is one of his most popular online partners in the U.S., and is a premiere online resource for his brand in China. Whether the popularity of Derek Lam’s designs has anything to do with his Chinese heritage I suspect is unlikely, but it is, at the very least, a testament to the growing demand for luxurious, sophisticated and non-logoed designs. 
Photo: dereklam.com
Source: Marc Karimzadeh, WWD
Nov 20

In the wee-hours of this morning (for U.S. readers), Chinese-American designer Derek Lam hosted a party in Shanghai at Unico at 3 on the Bund with Shopbop.com to fete his 10 Crosby resort collection. Shopbop, which launched a fully-translated Mandarin site last year, is one of his most popular online partners in the U.S., and is a premiere online resource for his brand in China. Whether the popularity of Derek Lam’s designs has anything to do with his Chinese heritage I suspect is unlikely, but it is, at the very least, a testament to the growing demand for luxurious, sophisticated and non-logoed designs. 

Photo: dereklam.com

Source: Marc Karimzadeh, WWD

According to global real estate adviser Cushman & Wakefield, New York’s Fifth Avenue is no longer home to the world’s most expensive retail property prices. After eleven years at the top, Hong Kong’s Causeway Bay (CWB)—humble home to this blog’s origins—has taken over as #1. Retail rents in CWB average $2,630/square foot in 2012 (an increase of 34.9% against the same period last year) versus Fifth Avenue’s $2,500 (an increase of 11.1%). 
Photo: discoverhongkong.com
Source: Joelle Diderich, WWD
Nov 19

According to global real estate adviser Cushman & Wakefield, New York’s Fifth Avenue is no longer home to the world’s most expensive retail property prices. After eleven years at the top, Hong Kong’s Causeway Bay (CWB)—humble home to this blog’s origins—has taken over as #1. Retail rents in CWB average $2,630/square foot in 2012 (an increase of 34.9% against the same period last year) versus Fifth Avenue’s $2,500 (an increase of 11.1%). 

Photo: discoverhongkong.com

Source: Joelle Diderich, WWD

Designer Liu Fang, China’s most awarded designer, held her first Parisian show for the Spring/Summer 2013 collection of Paluopo, the Chinese cashmere specialist, during fashion week this September as part of the third edition of “China in Paris.”   Vogue China has described her creations as, “Sculptures of soft gold,” but Liu Fang describes her style as more “futuristic.” “I combine the pure beauty of cashmere with complex knitting techniques that allow me to twist, overlay and entwine the fabric so the silhouette becomes like a sculpture.” (Paris Cherie)
I love the imaginative and fresh-eyed approach that Liu Fang brings to knits. Polished but deconstructed, her clever interplay between ribbed and open-weave knitted panels, asymmetrical hems, and origami folds is both edgy and classy at the same time. I can easily see items worn as-is or layered on both young and stylish mature customers alike. As for my personal favorites, I’ll take all the belted and unbelted “blazer” type tops, please.
Photos: AnyWearStyle
Nov 18

Designer Liu Fang, China’s most awarded designer, held her first Parisian show for the Spring/Summer 2013 collection of Paluopo, the Chinese cashmere specialist, during fashion week this September as part of the third edition of “China in Paris.”   Vogue China has described her creations as, “Sculptures of soft gold,” but Liu Fang describes her style as more “futuristic.” “I combine the pure beauty of cashmere with complex knitting techniques that allow me to twist, overlay and entwine the fabric so the silhouette becomes like a sculpture.” (Paris Cherie)

I love the imaginative and fresh-eyed approach that Liu Fang brings to knits. Polished but deconstructed, her clever interplay between ribbed and open-weave knitted panels, asymmetrical hems, and origami folds is both edgy and classy at the same time. I can easily see items worn as-is or layered on both young and stylish mature customers alike. As for my personal favorites, I’ll take all the belted and unbelted “blazer” type tops, please.

Photos: AnyWearStyle



"Mod Girls" photographed by Camilla Åkrans and styled by Ludivine Poiblanc. Models: Xiao Wen Ju, Ming Xi.  
Nov 17

"Mod Girls" photographed by Camilla Åkrans and styled by Ludivine Poiblanc. Models: Xiao Wen Ju, Ming Xi.  

Fellow FIDM alumnus, Ken Chen is one of San Francisco’s bright young talents. At the ripe old age of 23, his “extravagant yet elegant designs” have garnered him a number of successes and coverage in the few short years he’s been working on his line. Among his recent accomplishments are presenting during New York Fashion Week in February, and designing pieces for author/director Stephen Elliott’s feature film, “Cherry” (2012) starring James Franco, Dev Patel and Heather Graham. I got to take an in-depth look at his line earlier this week at the closing party of his temporary pop-up shop in San Francisco, put on in collaboration with Owen Geronimo of Fashion + Tech SF. 
Ken’s designs have been described as “boldly futuristic,” but the Fall ‘12 line is 100% wearable. The clean designs have just a hint of edge or the right pop of color that make getting dressed so un-fussy. Perfect for me, the reluctant (lazy?) fashionista. Even though quality in some of the details could be improved (everything is sewn individually in his SF studio, which leads to some inconsistency in execution), I walked away with a few pieces: the navy Crest Top, a ruched jersey tee, and the drab olive Semblance Shirtdress, which sadly was sold out in black. To his credit, the Ken Chen staff was very service-oriented and offered to custom make items that weren’t up to snuff. Definitely worth keeping an eye on this designer, especially his outerwear items, which require a bit of saving for. All in all, worth a trip back to his next pop-up or online shop.
Photo: SF Gate
Nov 16

Fellow FIDM alumnus, Ken Chen is one of San Francisco’s bright young talents. At the ripe old age of 23, his “extravagant yet elegant designs” have garnered him a number of successes and coverage in the few short years he’s been working on his line. Among his recent accomplishments are presenting during New York Fashion Week in February, and designing pieces for author/director Stephen Elliott’s feature film, “Cherry” (2012) starring James Franco, Dev Patel and Heather Graham. I got to take an in-depth look at his line earlier this week at the closing party of his temporary pop-up shop in San Francisco, put on in collaboration with Owen Geronimo of Fashion + Tech SF

Ken’s designs have been described as “boldly futuristic,” but the Fall ‘12 line is 100% wearable. The clean designs have just a hint of edge or the right pop of color that make getting dressed so un-fussy. Perfect for me, the reluctant (lazy?) fashionista. Even though quality in some of the details could be improved (everything is sewn individually in his SF studio, which leads to some inconsistency in execution), I walked away with a few pieces: the navy Crest Top, a ruched jersey tee, and the drab olive Semblance Shirtdress, which sadly was sold out in black. To his credit, the Ken Chen staff was very service-oriented and offered to custom make items that weren’t up to snuff. Definitely worth keeping an eye on this designer, especially his outerwear items, which require a bit of saving for. All in all, worth a trip back to his next pop-up or online shop.

Photo: SF Gate

Zhou Yi by Raymond Meier. Vogue China November 2012.
Nov 15

Zhou Yi by Raymond Meier. Vogue China November 2012.

Remember this?
This image from Gucci’s Fall 1996 campaign is one of the indelible fashion images from my youth. At the time, Tom Ford was well on his way to turning Gucci around into a envelope-pushing, sexy, billion dollar brand, and Toni Braxton was at the top of her game in a halter version of this dress in her video, “Un-Break My Heart”. This series of white cut-out dresses represents what I love most about the best of 90’s fashion: elegant, sexy, yet sporty minimalist design. I guess you could say I’m a 90’s girl the way that Rachel Zoe is a 70’s girl.
How exciting then, to see so many inspired looks on the Spring ‘13 runways? Celine, Haider Ackermann, and Alexander Wang took me down memory lane, each updating minimalism in their own way. The pure white mixed with navy, black and metallic accents/accessories is utterly to die for, even in print form. Like hats, I typically steer clear of prints, but Haider Ackermann’s masterful mix has convinced me that maybe they are worth a try. And of course, I would be remiss if I didn’t mention takes on this by some great Chinese and Singaporean Chinese designers: Masha Ma, Tze Goh, and Pauline.Ning. 
Nov 13

Remember this?

This image from Gucci’s Fall 1996 campaign is one of the indelible fashion images from my youth. At the time, Tom Ford was well on his way to turning Gucci around into a envelope-pushing, sexy, billion dollar brand, and Toni Braxton was at the top of her game in a halter version of this dress in her video, “Un-Break My Heart”. This series of white cut-out dresses represents what I love most about the best of 90’s fashion: elegant, sexy, yet sporty minimalist design. I guess you could say I’m a 90’s girl the way that Rachel Zoe is a 70’s girl.

How exciting then, to see so many inspired looks on the Spring ‘13 runways? Celine, Haider Ackermann, and Alexander Wang took me down memory lane, each updating minimalism in their own way. The pure white mixed with navy, black and metallic accents/accessories is utterly to die for, even in print form. Like hats, I typically steer clear of prints, but Haider Ackermann’s masterful mix has convinced me that maybe they are worth a try. And of course, I would be remiss if I didn’t mention takes on this by some great Chinese and Singaporean Chinese designers: Masha Ma, Tze Goh, and Pauline.Ning

Amazon, the standard bearer for e-commerce in market share and innovation, has struggled to make fashion as successful as its other retail categories. When CEO Jeff Bezos announced Amazon’s ambitions to take on the vertical at the Met Gala, which Amazon sponsored earlier this year, a collective eye-roll could be felt in the fashion world. Tech giants and online marketplaces (Google, eBay come to mind) have struggled to shake off their outsider image and out-of-touch-ness in the category for pretty much ever despite acquisitions and technical innovations that have aided the fashion industry. For starters, take a look at any of their fashion ads—no need to elaborate further, really. Can Amazon really crack the code others couldn’t?
Well, it seems Amazon is really dedicated to trying. In an effort to support this venture, Amazon is stepping up its push into fashion by leasing a 40,000 square foot studio on Kent Street in the Brooklyn, New York neighborhood of Williamsburg—the largest of its kind. The studio, set to be fully-staffed and ready to launch in the spring, is one of six that Amazon operates, but the only one in New York and the only one that will be dedicated uniquely to fashion. The studio will share talent among Amazon’s three fashion properties: Amazon Fashion, Shopbop and MyHabit, though each site will retain its own look and feel. 
It’ll be exciting to see how Amazon does. Maybe this time next year we’ll be able to buy well-edited, in-season designer clothes and accessories at a decent price and have them delivered for free on the same day. If anyone can do it, it’s Amazon, though my wallet’s telling me to be careful what I wish for.
Nov 7

Amazon, the standard bearer for e-commerce in market share and innovation, has struggled to make fashion as successful as its other retail categories. When CEO Jeff Bezos announced Amazon’s ambitions to take on the vertical at the Met Gala, which Amazon sponsored earlier this year, a collective eye-roll could be felt in the fashion world. Tech giants and online marketplaces (Google, eBay come to mind) have struggled to shake off their outsider image and out-of-touch-ness in the category for pretty much ever despite acquisitions and technical innovations that have aided the fashion industry. For starters, take a look at any of their fashion ads—no need to elaborate further, really. Can Amazon really crack the code others couldn’t?

Well, it seems Amazon is really dedicated to trying. In an effort to support this venture, Amazon is stepping up its push into fashion by leasing a 40,000 square foot studio on Kent Street in the Brooklyn, New York neighborhood of Williamsburg—the largest of its kind. The studio, set to be fully-staffed and ready to launch in the spring, is one of six that Amazon operates, but the only one in New York and the only one that will be dedicated uniquely to fashion. The studio will share talent among Amazon’s three fashion properties: Amazon Fashion, Shopbop and MyHabit, though each site will retain its own look and feel. 

It’ll be exciting to see how Amazon does. Maybe this time next year we’ll be able to buy well-edited, in-season designer clothes and accessories at a decent price and have them delivered for free on the same day. If anyone can do it, it’s Amazon, though my wallet’s telling me to be careful what I wish for.

Oct 31

Ming Pin Tien (Tien Mingping) is a London-based, Taiwanese designer who studied at the London College of Fashion and received his Masters there just earlier this year. Check out more photos of his Spring 2013 collection shown at London Fashion Week this fall. His solid, edited collection makes him one to watch.

Not too long ago, London Fashion Week hit a low point, many editors skipped right over it during the fashion week circuit, or sent their deputies to cover the shows. Over the past decade, however, London has not only regained its cache with fresh local talent, but it’s now also the one major fashion capital to show as many Asian designers as it does. Needless to say, it’s a much more interesting market to cover.
I picked Singaporean Eugene Lin to share today because I’m a total outerwear freak. My style is quite simple—give me 90s minimalism any day—I’m completely fine wearing a t-shirt and jeans forever so long as I have some fabulous outerwear. OK, so a sleek bag or interesting shoes don’t hurt either!
Eugene Lin’s collection at LFW started strong, but kind of petered out. His outerwear was the most interesting, but even so his ideas could stand to be developed more, and executed better. That said, the opening look (pictured) is my favorite, adding to my list of  interesting alternatives to the Burberry trench this spring: Eugene’s look above, Altuzarra’s trench, which is inspired by how editors wear their jackets, and Junya Watanabe’s cape trench. 
Oct 30

Not too long ago, London Fashion Week hit a low point, many editors skipped right over it during the fashion week circuit, or sent their deputies to cover the shows. Over the past decade, however, London has not only regained its cache with fresh local talent, but it’s now also the one major fashion capital to show as many Asian designers as it does. Needless to say, it’s a much more interesting market to cover.

I picked Singaporean Eugene Lin to share today because I’m a total outerwear freak. My style is quite simple—give me 90s minimalism any day—I’m completely fine wearing a t-shirt and jeans forever so long as I have some fabulous outerwear. OK, so a sleek bag or interesting shoes don’t hurt either!

Eugene Lin’s collection at LFW started strong, but kind of petered out. His outerwear was the most interesting, but even so his ideas could stand to be developed more, and executed better. That said, the opening look (pictured) is my favorite, adding to my list of  interesting alternatives to the Burberry trench this spring: Eugene’s look above, Altuzarra’s trench, which is inspired by how editors wear their jackets, and Junya Watanabe’s cape trench